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Category "Energy"

20Jun

IPDS for sub transmission & distribution network

by Team Digireach

India is a developing country. Power is the mainstay for any growing country. In order to leapfrog into the future, efficient utilization of power generation is of prime importance.

Electricity is the most important factor in the economic growth of any country. And the most critical segment of Power Sector chain including Generation, Transmission and Distribution, is the Distribution Sector. Efficient management of the distribution of electricity sector is mandatory as it acts as an interface between the utilities and the consumers. The real challenge in the power sector today lies in efficiency. However, the poor financial health of the distribution utilities in the States has resulted in inadequate investment in the distribution network making it difficult to meet the increasing demands of power in urban areas.

The goal of IPDS (Integrated Power Development Scheme)  are as follows:

  1. Strengthening of sub-transmission and distribution network in the urban areas;
    Metering of distribution transformers /feeders / consumers in the urban areas.
    3. IT enablement of distribution sector and strengthening of distribution network

The problems the government tries to address by implementing this scheme are as follows:

AT&C losses [The concept of Aggregate Technical & Commercial losses provides a realistic picture of loss situation in the context it is measured. It is combination of energy loss (Technical loss + Theft + inefficiency in billing) & commercial loss (Default in payment + inefficiency in collection).]

  • Establishment of IT enabled energy accounting / auditing system,
  • Improvement in billed energy based on metered consumption
  • Improvement in collection efficiency.

This is a part of the Indian government scheme of Restructured Accelerated Power Development and completion of the Reforms Programme (RAPDRP). It is a flagship programme of the Ministry of Power.

IPDS is important for a brighter future which will help enhance the economic growth of India. Electricity is vital for the overall development of the nation, and the Union Government by launching this scheme is all set to push India in the right direction of development.

Status as per No. 8/2/201 8-IPDS(Pt.) Government of lndia Ministry of Power

Projects worth Rs.30,005 Crore (Distribution Strenglhening work: Rs 2.7,626 Crore in 546 circles, IT enablement: Rs 985 crore in 1931 towns, ERP Rs 640 crore and Smart Meting: Rs 754 crore) have been sanctioned.

Better electricity leads to a better tomorrow. We, at Digital Reach are equipped with the hardware, software, system integration capabilities and domain knowledge to make this a reality.

13Jun

Automatic Under-Frequency Load Shedding

by Team Digireach

The maintenance of maximum service reliability has always been the primary concern of the electric utility industry. To ensure this, power systems are always designed and operated such that working is not affected in any system conditions and load requirements are always met. Usually the designing is such that it can hold up service continuity even under emergency situations, but sometimes, unpredictable conditions of faults, forced outages, etc. may occur. When this happens, it is important to ensure that steps are taken to ensure that a major system outage doesn’t occur.

Any part of a power system will begin to deteriorate if there is an excess of load over available generation. If there is an excess of load over generation ratio, the frequency decreases. It is generally recognised that a sudden drop in generating capacity results in a drop in frequency. This drop is not immediate, but rather, happens gradually.

One way to attain the balance between generation and load, before the decaying frequency affects performance, is to increase generation. However this isn’t always possible practically due to system limitations or due to time constraints. So, a more common method is to employ Automatic Under-Frequency Load Shedding (AUFLS). What this does is that it employs a quick and effective means of attaining a balance of generation and load. The application of AUFLS relays throughout the load area, preset to drop increments of load at specific values of low frequency, provides a simple and direct method of minimizing service interruption and alleviating system overloads.

The Load Shedding function provides under-frequency protection at the main distribution substation. As system frequency decreases, load is disconnected in discrete steps according to frequency thresholds. Protective relays are used for automatic gradually under-frequency load shedding. Under and over-frequency relays are specified by frequency settings and delays. And all this can be incorporated by using IoT Gateway which requires minimum system integration and is fully compatible with most of the applications.

7Jun

IoT in Utilities

by Team Digireach

 

IoT is considered as the next industrial revolution, Industry 4.0. The concept of IoT is to develop advanced solutions and services, enhance productivity & efficiency, solve critical problems, and improve real-time decisions. IoT is changing industry business models, and the utility industry is investing in IoT technology to transform its operations and enhance customer experience. IoT connected utilities can monitor and regulate operations in real-time to maximize efficiency and perform preventive maintenance. Moreover, IoT accelerates digital transformation in utilities.

Implementation of IoT can drastically change the direction the utility industry is headed towards. Many utility companies are on the verge if adopting IoT. Simply the investment in smart grid, smart meters, and home automation can allow utility companies to comprehensively recapture the energy industry and drive top-line growth.

When the utility industry adopts IoT, it connects with the consumer, with the grid, with the world, on a whole new scale. There’s a huge influx of data that can be harnessed to improve services. Companies can utilize smart meters and grids to optimize how the power is distributed. These systems enable greater forecasting capabilities, thereby driving down costs of generation through more efficient scheduling and reliability in the grid, as well as enabling customers to foresee spending patterns and better plan their energy usage over time.

A few applications and benefits of IoT in utilities:

  1. Smart meters are IoT-connected sensors on consumer utility lines. These report data back directly to the company, enabling real-time monitoring and analyzing of data. This can also alert company of maintenance issues and help resolve issues quicker.
  2. Condition-based maintenance routines can be improved by utilities using sensors which measure performance. Data is collected via communication networks to pinpoint problems and predict possible issues using analytics.
  3. Smart buildingscan control light and temperature in real time for maximum comfort and efficiency using interconnected sensors and building control systems.
  4. Precise water irrigation systemswith IoT sensors, including trickle and subsurface methods, greatly reduce water consumption and have the ability to integrate with utility demand response systems.
3Jun

IoT in Textile Industry

by Team Digireach

The textile industry has come a long way from the old handcrafting days, but it still has a huge potential for progress. As an industry which used to be highly labor intensive but has now achieved a high degree of automation, textile has been and will continue to be at the forefront of the adoption of new technologies.

Foremost among these new technologies is Internet of Things (IoT). Being an industry which relies heavily on fine details such as equipment monitoring, stock management for dyes and raw material, supply chain visibility, workforce management and coordination, and analysis, textile is the most suited industry for digital transformation.

Scope of IoT innovations in Textile Industry-

  1. Factory Operations Monitoring- Factory environment parameters such as humidity, temperature, etc., can seriously affect the quality of fabric and thereby the entire manufacturing process. Using sensors connected to the cloud, we can keep track of these conditions and regulate them, as necessary, using air conditioners, de humidifiers, etc.
  2. Equipment Maintenance- Machine properties and outputs can be synced to cloud data and monitored in real time. Necessary periodic and/or preventive maintenance can also be set to trigger when certain conditions are met.
  3. Energy/ Efficiency – The energy consumed in each of the machines can be monitored. Data can be collected and algorithm can be fad into the system to determine the efficiency of each of the unit. This would enable to do proper planning and lead to better efficiency.

While there is a huge scope for progress, there are also challenges which have to be overcome to make IoT in textile industry a reality-

  • Connection overhead and huge bandwidth consumption of multiple weaving machines connected over Ethernet
  • Administration and management of voluminous structured and unstructured data
  • Compatibility of ERP and Operations, Administration & Management System with IoT Service Management Platform
  • With huge amounts of data transferred online every second, the biggest challenge to IoT platforms is security and data protection.

If these challenges can be dealt with successfully textile industry can be optimized to its full potential with the incorporation of IoT.

8May

Why IIoT?

by Team Digireach

IoT (Internet of Things) is the future. The Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) is a subset of the Internet of Things (IoT). It is basically collecting data/ information from the field through sensors relying it to the cloud using an IoT gateway. The data is then stored in the cloud storages and analysed and used as per the requirement of the user.

A lot of industry sectors come under the gambit of IIoT. Energy, electricity, manufacturing, logistics etc. are in the nascent stage of deploying IIoT to garner the benefits. Financial benefits of fine-tuning the services by deploying IIoT can run into billions of dollars.

The advantages of IIoT:

  • Better Connectivity: The production personnel will always be aware of the flow of manufacturing at their plant. Individual efficiency of an equipment or a personnel can be tracked.
  • Better deployment: The bottlenecks and efficiency in a plant equipment can be readily read from the data collected. Efficient deployment of the resources can lead to increase to better productivity and less wastage of time.
  • Zero idle time: A constant track of resources and their usage. In a large factory it happens a lot of time that the resources remain idle which effectively is down-time for the production process.
  • Accuracy/ Quality: Automated tracking of the production process and removing manual intervention can lead to better quality of end-products.
  • Safety and repair: Limited manual intervention leads to better safety standards. Preventive detection of failure patterns can lead to timely intervention and service of the equipment. This leads to reduced downtime.
  • Logistics: The Industrial IoT (IIoT) can provide access to real-time supply chain information by deploying sensors at the different vital points in the value chain. A lot of the manufacturing plants have an ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) at their manufacturing plant. Effective reporting enables manufacturers to collect and feed delivery information into ERP. By connecting plants to suppliers, all the parties concerned with the supply chain can trace inter-dependencies, material flow and manufacturing cycle times. This data will help potentially reduces capital requirements, manufacturers predict issues, reduces inventory and
  • Cost savings: All the points mentioned above ultimately lead to reduction in the cost of manufacturing.

Another industry term which is interchangeably used with IIoT is Industry 4.0. Industry 4.0 is the current stage of the industrial revolution. It represents the use of Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), in manufacturing. Industry 4.0 focuses on the use of the cloud, gateways and communication networks to monitor factory processes and make data-based decisions.

8Apr

IPDS (Integrated Power Development Scheme)

by Team Digireach

We are moving to an energy intensive world. Among the different stages of electricity generation and consumption, distribution is a primary area where we can make necessary adjustments in the power sector value chain to increase efficiency drastically.

One of the features of the Indian power sector reforms is the increased attention to the distribution sector. Systems and procedures for monitoring Quality of Service (QoS) of distribution utilities have been finalized by State Electricity Regulatory Commissions, especially subsequent to the Electricity Act 2003.

Distribution is the most important link in the entire power sector value chain.  As the only interface between utilities and consumers, it is the cash register for the entire sector. Under the Indian Constitution, power is a Concurrent subject and the responsibility for distribution and supply of power to rural and urban consumers rests with the states.

Systems to improve consumer interface, quantify performance and to monitor progress in a transparent manner are necessary and welcome steps. QoS process meets one of the many long felt needs to improve distribution sector. At this initial stage, it is crucial that the distribution utilities and regulatory commissions show serious end to end commitment in the QoS process. This includes the steps of formulating the system, reporting performance, monitoring progress and taking corrective measures. It is also important to proactively work for the active participation of consumers at all stages of the process. With such an approach, over the years, QoS process can evolve to be the necessary and sufficient condition for continuous improvement of the distribution sector.

Government of India provides assistance to states through various Central Sector / centrally sponsored schemes for improving the distribution sector. Integrated Power Development Scheme (IPDS) approved on 20.11.2014 with a total outlay of Rs 32,612 crore which includes a budgetary support of Rs 25,354 crore from Govt. of India. The objectives of scheme are:

  • Strengthening of sub-transmission and distribution networks in the urban areas
  • Metering of distribution transformers / feeders / consumers in the urban area.
  • IT enablement of distribution sector and strengthening of distribution network
4Apr

Future of electricity

by Team Digireach

Electricity is the basis on which civilization thrives. We can’t even imagine a world just about 100 years ago which was devoid of electricity. Every development in the past century has been made possible due to power. We have reached a stage where power is a given. Now, the competition is on the quality of electricity.

Read More
29Mar

First step towards Smart grid

by Team Digireach

The world is now moving towards Electricity 4.0. Energy efficiency is an inherent component of Industry 4.0. A smart grid which monitors the inflow and outflow of energy data collected through strategically placed sensors is the first step in realizing Electricity 4.0.

Various parameters as mentioned below track the usage of energy, both from a quantity and quality perspective.

1. SAIFI (System Average Interruption Frequency Index)
SAIFI is measured in units of interruptions per customer. It is usually measured over the course of a year, and according to IEEE Standard 1366-1998 the median value for North American utilities is approximately 1.10 interruptions per customer.

2. SAIDI (System Average Interruption Duration Index)
SAIDI is measured in units of time, often minutes or hours. It is usually measured over the course of a year, and according to IEEE Standard 1366-1998 the median value for North American utilities is approximately 1.50 hours.

3. CAIFI (Customer Average Interruption Frequency Index)
CAIFI is designed to show trends in customers interrupted and helps to show the number of customers affected out of the whole customer base.

4. CAIDI (Customer Average Interruption Duration Index )
CAIDI gives the average outage duration that any given customer would experience. CAIDI can also be viewed as the average restoration time.
CAIDI is measured in units of time, often minutes or hours. It is usually measured over the course of a year, and according to IEEE Standard 1366-1998 the median value for North American utilities is approximately 1.36 hours.

5. MAIFI (Momentary Average Interruption Frequency Index)
MAIFI is useful for tracking momentary power outages, or “blinks,” that can be hidden or misrepresented by an overall outage duration index like SAIDI or SAIFI.

All these are reliability indicators used by electric power utilities.
The availability and reliability of electricity is crucial and an interruption or diminished quality would lead to serious consequences.

Power disturbances/blackouts or poor quality power impact critical power buildings on the level of business continuity, costs, safety or all of these.

The ultimate aim of Electricity 4.0 is to enhance maintenance and minimize disruptions. Tracking the indices listed above helps to monitor these important data points. Necessary alterations can be made as necessary once these data is available with the concerned authorities.

Power is the backbone of the industry. It is extremely important to make the foundations sturdy before we venture into implementing Industry 4.0 in other segments. A failure in a critical component in the manufacturing process results in enormous costs, so do issues with regards to electricity and power.

27Mar

Electricity Reliability Indices

by Team Digireach

We are entering an energy intensive world. It is very important to keep track of the energy utilized by the consumers so that necessary action can be taken to optimize it’s usage. There are various reliability indices which help us in determining the efficiency of distribution system.

SAIFI
SAIFI is the average number of sustained interruptions per consumer during the year. It is the ratio of the annual number of interruptions to the number of consumers.

SAIFI = (Total number of sustained interruptions in a year) / (Total number of consumers)

SAIDI
SAIDI is the average duration of interruptions per consumers during the year. It is the ratio of the annual duration of interruptions (sustained) to the number of consumers. If duration is specified in minutes, SAIDI is given as consumer minutes.

SAIDI = Total duration of sustained interruptions in a year / total number of consumers

CAIFI
CAIFI is the average number of interruptions for consumers who experience interruptions during the year. It is the ratio of the annual number of interruptions to the number of consumers affected by interruptions during the year. Consumer is counted only once regardless of the number of interruptions.

CAIFI = Total number of sustained interruptions in a year/Total number of consumers affected.

CAIDI
CAIDI is the average duration of an interruption, calculated based on the total number of sustained interruptions in a year. It is the ratio of the total duration of interruptions to the total number of interruptions during the year.

CAIDI = Total duration of sustained interruptions in a year/total number of interruptions.

MAIFI
MAIFI is the average number of momentary (less than 5 minutes) interruptions per consumer during the year. It is the ratio of the annual number of momentary interruptions to the number of consumers.

MAIFI = (Total number of momentary interruptions in a year ) / (Total number of consumers)

The above indices are the commonly used parameters used to judge the reliability for electricity generation, transmission and distribution. These outage indices are based on the duration of each power supply interruption & the frequency of interruption. It is clear that all three major functional components of the power system – generation, transmission & distribution contribute to reliability.

IoT and monitoring of electrical parameters enables to keep track of the various energy parameters which can be used to further judge the reliability of electricity distribution. The tariff can be adjusted according to this reliability indices. It would be a win-win situation for the all the stakeholders in electricity domain. Also, the end consumers will be benefited and charged according to the quality of power delivered. It would be a step towards Electricity 4.0.

21Mar

The Internet of Electric Cars

by Team Digireach

Electric cars are the heroes that humanity needs

Electric cars are the need of the hour with global warming looking over our shoulders every second. They’re eco-friendly, highly responsive to controls, quiet and less maintenance. The perfect counter to the alarmingly high carbon footprint on Earth.

Of course, they come with disadvantages too. With a range of 60 to 130 miles per charge on an average, they have mileage significantly lesser than gas powered cars. That can be a quite a hassle if you frequently take long trips. Few can afford the luxury models that give an output of 300 miles per charge.

Charging an Electric car is a time-consuming task as the process can take up to whopping 8 hours to complete. Even if you opt for fast charging, it will still take 30 minutes for you to be on your way. It is a major disadvantage when time is of essence. Time is of essence and this delay can be a major deterrent for people considering buying an electric car.

EVs and their battery packs are expensive, and they need frequent replacement. However, state incentives and fuel cost savings can make up for the difference in cost incurred. And of course, contributing to a cleaner environment and save the human race from extinction due to global warming is both the goal and the reward in itself.

These problems need not be the end of the world though. Even electric cars deserve a hero and that hero is called the Internet of Things.

All of the problems mentioned above can be resolved to one degree or the other with IoT. With its remarkable ability for remote monitoring, predicting, identifying and resolving the problem can be done in a jiffy. The result is the reduction of unnecessary expense, and a hassle free trip. IoT also provides valuable information about charging stations nearby. And of course, you can access updates in your EV as soon as they are launched.

10 percent of transport vehicular emissions are just from vehicles stuck in traffic jams. With IoT connecting the car to traffic signals, public transport timetables and real time updates of traffic, harmful emissions will reduce drastically. By the year 2025, more than 50 billion vehicles enabled with IoT will hit the road. Just enabling a car with IoT is doing a lot to reduce emissions. IoT in an electric vehicle is a planet saver.

 

 

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