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Category "Manufacturing"

11Jul

Sensors and Data Streams in IoT

by Team Digireach

Internet of Things (IoT) brings a whole new world of data, real-time streaming requirements, operational difficulties, security, and a large stream of massive data that needs to be made available for use at scale. IoT devices find application in various settings- factories, industries, power plants, vehicles, etc. to name a few. These devices output massive amounts of data from the sensors they use. This data is streamed non-stop and is used for making future predictions, assess the current conditions, optimize the working, etc.

The data from the onboard sensors is based on things like humidity, temperature, air conditions, luminance, etc. The data from these sensors is used by billions of other devices, people, organizations and places. While the management of such a network has its own problems, the opportunities are abundant too.

First, let’s talk about the sensors. Sensors first appeared decades ago, as a means to detect changes in quantity and give the output as an electrical or optical signal. They have been used for many purposes and in various fields over the years, from utilities and energy, to manufacturing and industries. Now with the rise of IoT, the uses of sensors – and the data streaming from them – has diversified manifold and continues to do so. From the largest of aircrafts to the smallest of pacemakers, the data from the sensors flows from the devices to the network and back and this has made the IoT a major contributor to Big Data.

Today, organizations are investing heavily in capturing and store the data from the sensors, but it is extraction and analysis of that data which is the daunting task. To take full advantage of data streams in the IoT, organizations must understand the exploding number of ways “big” IoT data needs to be filtered, mashed up, compared, contrasted, interpolated and extrapolated. The 4 ‘V’s which need to be considered by the organization are-

  1. Volume- whether the massive amount of data being received can be accessed, stored, processed and analyzed.
  2. Variety- whether the various types of data and their formats can be managed on the fly.
  3. Velocity- whether the data can be captured and analyzed as fast as the rate at which it is being generated.
  4. Veracity- whether the data has been filtered, validated or cleansed and made trustworthy enough for use as basis of data-driven decisions.

If these conditions are suitably met by the organization, they can easily distinguish themselves from their competitors and be at the forefront of the IoT Industrial Revolution aka Industry 4.0.

26Feb

Manufacturing safety

by Team Digireach

The Internet of Things is the superhero of this era. There is a lot of fancy tech that it can accomplish in microseconds. But its most remarkable super power is the ability to rescue human beings from danger just like a superhero. It can make people feel protected.

IoT is a superhero that uses its powers (Internet connection) in ways that boggles the mind and defies the concept of impossibility.

Factories and manufacturing plants can be some of the most dangerous places to work at because of hazardous elements like thermal extremes, highly concentrated toxic or flammable substances and low oxygen levels that are generally controlled by manual or sensory procedures. There are some processes require employees to handle lifting and moving equipment . Any mishap or tampering in even one of these can cause severe harm and even loss of life.

What are the current problems with providing workers with enough protection?

Factories must be able to provide effective protection while not burdening the worker so much that they are impeded in carrying out their tasks in an efficient and effective manner.

How can workers actually be protected?

This can be done by removing the uncertainty factor from the equation. The Internet of Things enables real time monitoring to detect any potential and currently occurring hazards. There are different kinds of sensors that have a specific function. While we had sensors earlier, now we have smart sensors which can either send alerts or take action according to the stimulus received.

The smart objects can be wearable or fixed depending on its functions. Activity-aware smart objects record the activity around it while policy-aware smart objects interpret the activity in a particular context. Process-aware smart objects guide workers with solutions based on lightning quick analysis of the data received from activity and policy smart objects.

Monitoring is done on three levels, namely: environment, situation context and the humans themselves.

The wearables mentioned earlier can measure an employee’s heart rate and other body vitals to keep track of their health. Many accidents can be prevented by this kind of regular check up. Employers can be alerted if an employee is too fatigued. Since optimum performance can only come with good health, employers can make sure to give appropriate rest breaks.

Parting thoughts:

The storm of Internet enabled devices is upending old, obsolete techniques and making way for the new. Your friendly, workplace IoT is here to stay and save the day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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