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Category "Predictive maintenance"

13Jun

Automatic Under-Frequency Load Shedding

by Team Digireach

The maintenance of maximum service reliability has always been the primary concern of the electric utility industry. To ensure this, power systems are always designed and operated such that working is not affected in any system conditions and load requirements are always met. Usually the designing is such that it can hold up service continuity even under emergency situations, but sometimes, unpredictable conditions of faults, forced outages, etc. may occur. When this happens, it is important to ensure that steps are taken to ensure that a major system outage doesn’t occur.

Any part of a power system will begin to deteriorate if there is an excess of load over available generation. If there is an excess of load over generation ratio, the frequency decreases. It is generally recognised that a sudden drop in generating capacity results in a drop in frequency. This drop is not immediate, but rather, happens gradually.

One way to attain the balance between generation and load, before the decaying frequency affects performance, is to increase generation. However this isn’t always possible practically due to system limitations or due to time constraints. So, a more common method is to employ Automatic Under-Frequency Load Shedding (AUFLS). What this does is that it employs a quick and effective means of attaining a balance of generation and load. The application of AUFLS relays throughout the load area, preset to drop increments of load at specific values of low frequency, provides a simple and direct method of minimizing service interruption and alleviating system overloads.

The Load Shedding function provides under-frequency protection at the main distribution substation. As system frequency decreases, load is disconnected in discrete steps according to frequency thresholds. Protective relays are used for automatic gradually under-frequency load shedding. Under and over-frequency relays are specified by frequency settings and delays. And all this can be incorporated by using IoT Gateway which requires minimum system integration and is fully compatible with most of the applications.

3Jun

IoT in Textile Industry

by Team Digireach

The textile industry has come a long way from the old handcrafting days, but it still has a huge potential for progress. As an industry which used to be highly labor intensive but has now achieved a high degree of automation, textile has been and will continue to be at the forefront of the adoption of new technologies.

Foremost among these new technologies is Internet of Things (IoT). Being an industry which relies heavily on fine details such as equipment monitoring, stock management for dyes and raw material, supply chain visibility, workforce management and coordination, and analysis, textile is the most suited industry for digital transformation.

Scope of IoT innovations in Textile Industry-

  1. Factory Operations Monitoring- Factory environment parameters such as humidity, temperature, etc., can seriously affect the quality of fabric and thereby the entire manufacturing process. Using sensors connected to the cloud, we can keep track of these conditions and regulate them, as necessary, using air conditioners, de humidifiers, etc.
  2. Equipment Maintenance- Machine properties and outputs can be synced to cloud data and monitored in real time. Necessary periodic and/or preventive maintenance can also be set to trigger when certain conditions are met.
  3. Energy/ Efficiency – The energy consumed in each of the machines can be monitored. Data can be collected and algorithm can be fad into the system to determine the efficiency of each of the unit. This would enable to do proper planning and lead to better efficiency.

While there is a huge scope for progress, there are also challenges which have to be overcome to make IoT in textile industry a reality-

  • Connection overhead and huge bandwidth consumption of multiple weaving machines connected over Ethernet
  • Administration and management of voluminous structured and unstructured data
  • Compatibility of ERP and Operations, Administration & Management System with IoT Service Management Platform
  • With huge amounts of data transferred online every second, the biggest challenge to IoT platforms is security and data protection.

If these challenges can be dealt with successfully textile industry can be optimized to its full potential with the incorporation of IoT.

26Feb

Manufacturing safety

by Team Digireach

The Internet of Things is the superhero of this era. There is a lot of fancy tech that it can accomplish in microseconds. But its most remarkable super power is the ability to rescue human beings from danger just like a superhero. It can make people feel protected.

IoT is a superhero that uses its powers (Internet connection) in ways that boggles the mind and defies the concept of impossibility.

Factories and manufacturing plants can be some of the most dangerous places to work at because of hazardous elements like thermal extremes, highly concentrated toxic or flammable substances and low oxygen levels that are generally controlled by manual or sensory procedures. There are some processes require employees to handle lifting and moving equipment . Any mishap or tampering in even one of these can cause severe harm and even loss of life.

What are the current problems with providing workers with enough protection?

Factories must be able to provide effective protection while not burdening the worker so much that they are impeded in carrying out their tasks in an efficient and effective manner.

How can workers actually be protected?

This can be done by removing the uncertainty factor from the equation. The Internet of Things enables real time monitoring to detect any potential and currently occurring hazards. There are different kinds of sensors that have a specific function. While we had sensors earlier, now we have smart sensors which can either send alerts or take action according to the stimulus received.

The smart objects can be wearable or fixed depending on its functions. Activity-aware smart objects record the activity around it while policy-aware smart objects interpret the activity in a particular context. Process-aware smart objects guide workers with solutions based on lightning quick analysis of the data received from activity and policy smart objects.

Monitoring is done on three levels, namely: environment, situation context and the humans themselves.

The wearables mentioned earlier can measure an employee’s heart rate and other body vitals to keep track of their health. Many accidents can be prevented by this kind of regular check up. Employers can be alerted if an employee is too fatigued. Since optimum performance can only come with good health, employers can make sure to give appropriate rest breaks.

Parting thoughts:

The storm of Internet enabled devices is upending old, obsolete techniques and making way for the new. Your friendly, workplace IoT is here to stay and save the day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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